100 Birds and How They Got Their Names

* Read ! 100 Birds and How They Got Their Names by Diana Wells ✓ eBook or Kindle ePUB. 100 Birds and How They Got Their Names Elizabeth Rosenthal said A look into the history of birds and words. Sometimes author Diana Wells gets a little too caught up in the etymology of various birds Latin names, and then this book reads more like a dry encyclopedia than an affectionate survey of the relationship between some of the sweetest creatures on Earth and human language.Usually, though, Ms. Wells succeeds in vividly tracing the evolution of the laypersons avian ter. Fun read but it is not a field guide Spring is here, and e

100 Birds and How They Got Their Names

Author :
Rating : 4.52 (722 Votes)
Asin : 156512281X
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 320 Pages
Publish Date : 2016-08-06
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

Libs., Oxford, OH Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. Each of the alphabetically arranged entries includes a black-and-white sketch. Tidbits and trivia, as well as literary, folkloric, biblical, mythical, or other references, help explain why a bird is named as it is. Wells discusses the origin of the scientific name, clarifying the meaning of the original Latin terminology, and often recounts who selected the name and why or for whom the bird was named. There is a satisfying mix of common birds (e.g., cardinal, crow, and goose) and more exotic species (e.g., cassowary, bird of paradise, and hoatzin). Especially well timed with the recent publication of new field guides by David Sibley and Kenn Kaufman, this volume will make a likable, but not imperative, addition to public and academic libraries with ornithological collections. . From Library Journal In this little volume, Wells (100

Meet the intrepid adventurers and naturalists who risked their lives to describe and name new birds. Learn the mythical stories of the gods and goddess associated with bird names. A group of starlings is called a murmuration because they chatter so when they roost in the thousands. Organized alphabetically, each of these bird tales is accompanied by a two-color line drawing. Chaffinches, whose Latin name means "unmarried," are called "bachelor birds" because they congregate in flocks of one gender. A sampling of the bird lore you'll find inside: Benjamin Franklin didn't want the bald eagle on our National Seal because of its "bad moral character," (it steals from other birds); he lobbied for the turkey instead. Dip into 100 Birds and you'll never look at a sparrow, an ostrich, or a wren in quite the same way.. Since mockingbirds mimic speech, some Native American tribes fed mockingbird hearts to their children, believing it helped them learn language. With her remarkable ability to dig up curious and captivating facts, Diana Wells hatches a treat for active birders and armchair enthusiasts alike. How did cranes come to symbolize matrimonial happiness?

Elizabeth Rosenthal said A look into the history of birds and words. Sometimes author Diana Wells gets a little too caught up in the etymology of various birds' Latin names, and then this book reads more like a dry encyclopedia than an affectionate survey of the relationship between some of the sweetest creatures on Earth and human language.Usually, though, Ms. Wells succeeds in vividly tracing the evolution of the layperson's avian ter. Fun read but it is not a field guide Spring is here, and especially in the northern climates, our thoughts begin to focus on the reawakening of nature. Everything that has been at rest comes alive and shouts, "I'm back!" Trees begin to bud, flowers sprout up as we anticipate their glorious colors. And then there are the birds. For many, there is a special anticipation of the birds' return. It is how we kn. "fun with bird words" according to Gary Sprandel. Delightfully literate look at both the origin of bird names (etymology) as well as the common usage of the names. Wells first looks at Greek, Latin, or Egyptian sources for the names. For example, I did not know that Egyptian mummified Ibis, the source of the ibis name. She also calls up stories of early biologists as Linnaeus, Mark Catsby, and Audubon to look at some

OTHER BOOK COLLECTION