Ganesha's Sweet Tooth

* Read * Ganeshas Sweet Tooth by Emily Haynes, Sanjay Patel ↠ eBook or Kindle ePUB. Ganeshas Sweet Tooth Im glad to have different cultures stories in my sons library according to Lori. i suspected, but didnt know for sure, that this was a cultural legend until I read the note at the end of the book. Im glad to have different cultures stories in my sons library! Overall, I like the message of the story, but the way its presented here is pretty uninspiring and likely doesnt do the original legend justice. But the illustrations-- some of my favorite Ive ever seen! Bright, geometric, somew

Ganesha's Sweet Tooth

Author :
Rating : 4.18 (829 Votes)
Asin : 1452103623
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 40 Pages
Publish Date : 2016-03-09
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

The bold, bright colors of India leap right off the page in this fresh and funny picture book retelling (with a twist) of how Ganesha came to help write the epic poem of Hindu literature, the Mahabharata. Ganesha is just like any other kid, except that he has the head of an elephant and rides around on a magical mouse. And he loves sweets, especially the traditional dessert laddoo. But when Ganesha insists on biting into a super jumbo jawbreaker laddoo, his tusk breaks off! Ganesha is terribly upset, but with the help of the wise poet Vyasa, and his friend Mr. Mouse, he learns that what seems broken can actually be quite useful after all. With vibrant, graphic illustrations, expressive characters, and offbeat humor, this is a wonderfully inventive rendition of a classic tale.

He is furious and bitterly ashamed until he meets Vyasa the poet, who needs the tusk to write his poem, which is so long that “all the pens in the world would break before it is done.” So Ganesha helps the poet and uses his tusk to write the 100,000 verses of a story, which turns out to be so beautiful he even forgets about sweets. Here Ganesha is “just like any other kid” except that he has an elephant’s head, and vividly colored pictures show him cruising around on a magical mouse. Grades 1-3. --Hazel Rochman . Blending computer graphics with traditional images, the intricate, stylized illustrations may be best suited for grade-schoolers, who will enjoy the story’s turnarounds and focus on luscious sweets, and many will be ready for the clas

"I'm glad to have different cultures' stories in my son's library" according to Lori. i suspected, but didn't know for sure, that this was a cultural legend until I read the note at the end of the book. I'm glad to have different cultures' stories in my son's library! Overall, I like the message of the story, but the way it's presented here is pretty uninspiring and likely doesn't do the original legend justice. But the illustrations-- some of my favorite I've ever seen! Bright, geometric, somewhat abstract. I'll fo. "Super cute" according to Vi Synster. Very cute story and amazing illustrations.. Great for Children! Very cute illustrations and well written children's book

His modern interpretations of Hindu epics have been exhibited at the San Francisco Asian Art Museum. He lives in Oakland, California.Emily Haynes is an editor by day, specializing in entertainment and humor titles, and a children's writer by night. She lives in Oakland, California. Sanjay is also the creator of Ramayana: Divine Loophole, The Big Poster Book of Hindu Deities, and The Little Book of Hindu Deities. In her spare time she can often be found up to her elbows