Koba the Dread : Laughter and the Twenty Million

[Martin Amis] ✓ Koba the Dread : Laughter and the Twenty Million ¼ Read Online eBook or Kindle ePUB. Koba the Dread : Laughter and the Twenty Million Why the Soviet Union still matters Martin Amis analysis of Stalin and the Soviet terror begins with a simple yet probing question: Why can people joke about Stalin, the USSR, and their past flirtations with communism, while no one can (in acceptable society) make similar jokes about Hitler and National So. Brilliant and Provocative Ethan Cooper A well attended panel discussion in London in the nineties featured a high-profile thinker and writer and former apologist for Stalinism. In the discu

Koba the Dread : Laughter and the Twenty Million

Author :
Rating : 4.76 (917 Votes)
Asin : 0676975186
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 336 Pages
Publish Date : 0000-00-00
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

Why the Soviet Union still matters Martin Amis' analysis of Stalin and the Soviet terror begins with a simple yet probing question: Why can people joke about Stalin, the USSR, and their past "flirtations" with communism, while no one can (in acceptable society) make similar jokes about Hitler and National So. Brilliant and Provocative Ethan Cooper A well attended panel discussion in London in the nineties featured a high-profile thinker and writer and former apologist for Stalinism. In the discussion, this writer (Christopher Hitchens) acknowledged that, in his youth, he underestimated the evils of Stalinism. At the . "Excellent Analysis of the Psychology of Authoritarianism" according to Odysseus. Amis' little tome is a splendid anlysis of the psychology of authoritarianism. If you are looking for a book about the Soviet Union in World War II, the Gulags, the Russian Revolution, and the like -- look elsewhere. In short, "Koba the Dread" examines the utter banality of

Koba the Dread is the successor to Martin Amis's celebrated memoir, Experience. The author's father, Kingsley Amis, though later reactionary in tendency, was 'a Comintern dogsbody' (as he would come to put it) from 1941 to 1956. Stalin said that the death of one person was tragic, the death of a million a mere 'statistic'. His second-closest, and then his closest friend (after the death of the poet Philip Larkin), was Robert Conquest, a leading Sovietologist, whose book of 1968, The Great Terror, was second only to Solzhenitsyn's The Gulag Archipelago in undermin

There wasn't a famine,' he said, smiling slightly and lowering his gaze. Not quite a memoir, this book sandwiches a lengthy treatise on the horror of life in Leninist and Stalinist Russia between Amis's brief personal takes on his gradually dawning awareness of Soviet atrocities. Throughout, Amis snipes at Hitchens in particular ( What about the famine?' I once asked him. From Publishers Weekly Everyone knows what the Holocaust was, but, Amis points out, there is no name for and comparatively little public awareness of the killing that took place in the Soviet Union between 1917 and 1933, when 20 million died under a Bolshevik regime that r

OTHER BOOK COLLECTION