Letters to a Young Scientist

^ Read # Letters to a Young Scientist by Edward O. Wilson ↠ eBook or Kindle ePUB. Letters to a Young Scientist Dusty Rhoads said When E.O. speaks, we younger ones everywhere listen.. So, I was more than a little surprised that a new book by EO Wilson was out for more than 8 seconds without a single review yet posted on Amazon. I rarely write a review unless I feel passionately about an item -- at one end of the spectrum or another -- but I could not resist the chance to write the first review for a book by a scientist whom I revere and admire for his indomitable energy and unrelenting productivity.I shou

Letters to a Young Scientist

Author :
Rating : 4.17 (985 Votes)
Asin : 0871403773
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 256 Pages
Publish Date : 2017-02-25
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

From the collapse of stars to the exploration of rain forests and the oceans’ depths, Wilson instills a love of the innate creativity of science and a respect for the human being’s modest place in the planet’s ecosystem in his readers. Wilson imparts the wisdom of his storied career to the next generation. Edward O. Pulitzer Prize–winning biologist Edward O. Reflecting on his coming-of-age in the South as a Boy Scout and a lover of ants and butterflies, Wilson threads these twenty-one letters, each richly illustrated, with autobiographical anecdotes that illuminate his careerboth his successes and his failuresand his motivations for becoming a biologist. Wilson has distilled sixty years of teaching into a book for students, young and old. At a time in human history when our survival is more than ever linked to our understanding of science, Wilson insists that success in the sciences does not depend on mathematical skill, but rather a passion for finding a problem and solving it. 21 illustrations

The author of more than twenty books, including The Creation, The Social Conquest of Earth, The Meaning of Human Existence, and Letters to a Young Scientist, Wilson is a professor emeritus at Harvard University. Wilson is widely recognized as one of the world's preeminent biologists and naturalists. . Edward O.

From Booklist *Starred Review* “What is this grand enterprise called science that has lit up heaven and earth and empowered humanity?” Wilson, a foremost authority on ants and biodiversity now in his eighties, has dedicated his life to this “culture of illuminations” in the field and laboratory and as a Harvard professor and best-selling writer. Warm, sage, and compelling, this concise and mighty book of wisdom and encouragement belongs in every library. “The world needs you––badly,” Wilson writes, explaini

Dusty Rhoads said When E.O. speaks, we younger ones everywhere listen.. So, I was more than a little surprised that a new book by EO Wilson was out for more than 8 seconds without a single review yet posted on Amazon. I rarely write a review unless I feel passionately about an item -- at one end of the spectrum or another -- but I could not resist the chance to write the first review for a book by a scientist whom I revere and admire for his indomitable energy and unrelenting productivity.I should preface my review by acknowledging that I am a somewhat biased devotee of Wilson's in that I think he and I share much in common: I am a snake biologist (P. Good effort, but narrow 3.5 starsWilson does an excellent job at summarizing some very important pieces of advice in science. He espouses the importance of the "prepared mind", the necessity of in depth and general knowledge of the subject area, and the benefits of being passionate about your area of interest. He provides some encouraging remarks for students who do not excel at math, and some observations about the importance of IQ in science (he actually argues that a high IQ may be harmful because it does not necessitate that the individual persevere).But his advice is not broadly applicable to all t. hkGood read but misleading title E.O. Wilson has again written another very good, readable book. My reason for giving it only three stars is that the title "Letters to a Young Scientist" is somewhat misleading. It could more accurately be title "A Brief Autobiography of E.O. Wilson with Occasional Advice to a Young Scientist Interested in Biology." Wilson's title chapters certainly appear to make their subjects appear to be some form of counsel or another, and in the introductions and conclusions they generally contain some modicum of it. However, it does not take long before Wilson begins waxing on about his ow. "Good read but misleading title" according to hkGood read but misleading title E.O. Wilson has again written another very good, readable book. My reason for giving it only three stars is that the title "Letters to a Young Scientist" is somewhat misleading. It could more accurately be title "A Brief Autobiography of E.O. Wilson with Occasional Advice to a Young Scientist Interested in Biology." Wilson's title chapters certainly appear to make their subjects appear to be some form of counsel or another, and in the introductions and conclusions they generally contain some modicum of it. However, it does not take long before Wilson begins waxing on about his ow. 2. E.O. Wilson has again written another very good, readable book. My reason for giving it only three stars is that the title "Letters to a Young Scientist" is somewhat misleading. It could more accurately be title "A Brief Autobiography of E.O. Wilson with Occasional Advice to a Young Scientist Interested in Biology." Wilson's title chapters certainly appear to make their subjects appear to be some form of counsel or another, and in the introductions and conclusions they generally contain some modicum of it. However, it does not take long before Wilson begins waxing on about his ow. said Good read but misleading title. E.O. Wilson has again written another very good, readable book. My reason for giving it only three stars is that the title "Letters to a Young Scientist" is somewhat misleading. It could more accurately be title "A Brief Autobiography of E.O. Wilson with Occasional Advice to a Young Scientist Interested in Biology." Wilson's title chapters certainly appear to make their subjects appear to be some form of counsel or another, and in the introductions and conclusions they generally contain some modicum of it. However, it does not take long before Wilson begins waxing on about his ow