Max Perutz and the Secret of Life

* Max Perutz and the Secret of Life ✓ PDF Download by ! Georgina Ferry eBook or Kindle ePUB Online free. Max Perutz and the Secret of Life Max was demanding, passionate and driven but also humorous, compassionate and loving. In 1947, he founded the small research group in which Francis Crick and James Watson discovered the structure of DNA: under his leadership it grew to become the world-famous Laboratory for Molecular Biology. Bernal. In 1940, he was interned and deported to Canada as an enemy alien, only to be brought back and set to work on a bizarre top secret war project. Small in stature, he became a fearless mountain climbe

Max Perutz and the Secret of Life

Author :
Rating : 4.50 (687 Votes)
Asin : 0879697857
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 304 Pages
Publish Date : 2017-06-12
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

She lives in Oxford. . Georgina Ferry is a former staff editor on New Scientist, and contributor to Radio 4's Science Now. Her books include the acclaimed biography Dorothy Hodgkin: A Life (1998); The Common Thread (2002), with Sir John Sulston) and A Computer Called LEO (2003)

Max was demanding, passionate and driven but also humorous, compassionate and loving. In 1947, he founded the small research group in which Francis Crick and James Watson discovered the structure of DNA: under his leadership it grew to become the world-famous Laboratory for Molecular Biology. Bernal. In 1940, he was interned and deported to Canada as an enemy alien, only to be brought back and set to work on a bizarre top secret war project. Small in stature, he became a fearless mountain climber; drawing on his own experience as a refugee, he argued fearlessly for human rights; he could be ruthless but had a talent for friendship. Few scientists have thought more deeply about the nature of their calling and its impact on humanity than Max Perutz (1914-2002). Born in Vienna, Jewish by descent, lapsed Catholic by religion, he came to Cambridge in 1936 to join the la

"A Determined Researcher, A Brilliant Organizer" according to Rob Hardy. Max Perutz used to say that he was famous, but that few people knew what it was he was famous for. His name may not resonate with household familiarity, but he was a Nobel laureate for his work on the structure of hemoglobin and was enormously influential in organizing other scientists working in what was then a new field of molecular biology. He died in 2002, working up until his last days, and although he was an accomplished writer, he didn't get around to writing an autobiography because he consciously decided that his time was best spent researching instead. Now there is a fine biography that will help readers apprec. A wonderful life This is a lovely biography of a wonderful man. This review does not show an Amazon purchase tag because I was loaned this book by a man who was one of Max's students. His life teaches us why science, pure science not the rent seeking behavior on exhibit at the East Anglia University, can provide a satisfying career, whether or not one is recognized with public rewards. Max Perutz grew up the somewhat sickly son of a Jewish textile manufacturing family. They were quite secularized and like many Jews of the time and place, were slow to recognize the danger of the Nazis. Still, by some good luck, Max ended up in England whe

As the official biographer, Ferry has handled Perutz s mix of vanity and self-deprecation, vicious critique and devoted admiration, diplomatically, reporting not judging. Whether dealing with personal matters or explaining the science, Ferry handles the subject matter with ease and clarity. Ferry takes Perutz s career through to the end of his life with his work on the amyloid associated with Alzheimer s disease. The Quarterly Review of Biology --The Quarterly Review of Biology . Nature Medicine --NatureFerry does a superb job of using the correspondence, archival sources, interviews, and other traditional tools of biography writingTeachers of undergraduates will treasure this book for the rich coverage of the birth of molecular biology and the circumstances that made it possible. The result is an engaging, beautifully written book deserving a place on the shelf of everyone who likes to read about science and scientists. On all counts, Ferry s beautifully written book meets

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