River of Lakes: A Journey on Florida's St. Johns River

[Bill Belleville] ↠ River of Lakes: A Journey on Floridas St. Johns River ´ Read Online eBook or Kindle ePUB. River of Lakes: A Journey on Floridas St. Johns River The first highway through the once wild interior of Florida, the St. Johns may appear ordinary, but within its banks are some of the most fascinating natural phenomena and historic mysteries in the state. River of Lakes weaves together the biological, cultural, anthropological, archaeological, and ecological aspects of the St. First explored by naturalist William Bartram in the 1760s, the St. Johns, capturing the essence of its remarkable history and intrinsic value as a natural wonder.

River of Lakes: A Journey on Florida's St. Johns River

Author :
Rating : 4.57 (782 Votes)
Asin : 0820323446
Format Type : paperback
Number of Pages : 246 Pages
Publish Date : 2017-03-26
Language : English

DESCRIPTION:

The first "highway" through the once wild interior of Florida, the St. Johns may appear ordinary, but within its banks are some of the most fascinating natural phenomena and historic mysteries in the state. River of Lakes weaves together the biological, cultural, anthropological, archaeological, and ecological aspects of the St. First explored by naturalist William Bartram in the 1760s, the St. Johns, capturing the essence of its remarkable history and intrinsic value as a natural wonder.. He rediscovers the natural Florida and establishes his connection with a place once loved for its untamed beauty. Johns, kayaking, boating, hiking its riverbanks, diving its springs, and exploring its underwater caves. Johns River stretches 310 miles along Florida's east coast, making it the longest river in the state. The river, no longer the commercial resource it once was, is now largely ignored by Florida's residents and visitors alike.In the first contemporary book about this American Heritage River, Bill Belleville describes his journey down the length of the St. Belleville involves scientists, environmentalists, fishermen, cave divers, and folk historians in his journey, soliciting their companionship and their expertise

And more: it is a place of rare qualities, one that deserves to be protected. Less well known than the embattled Everglades, northern Florida's St. Johns," writes naturalist Bill Belleville, "is surely one long and meandering palimpsest," a place that has been remade many times over as humans have sought to grow crops, raise livestock, and otherwise make the river bend to their will. Johns River has long been subject to the same forces that have imperiled that vast wetland. It is a place, he writes, of giant snails and nesting herons, a place of wild storms and suffocatingly ho

"Excellent book" according to Bob. I really enjoyed this book as it is a wonderful mixture of history, exploration, and imagery. The author is so descriptive that you can easily follow the entire journey with a map. I suggest anyone really wanting to get into this book to follow the author in Google Earth - all of the coves, springs, rivers, points, towns, islands, lakes, and bridges are named, and on top of that there are Panoramio pictures to view in most areas. For example, when he describes the huge oak tree in Astor, I zoomed in and clicked a few picture. Hannah Holmes said A Florida Vacation, Minus The Mouse. This is one of those vacation-like books that I hoped wouldn't end. From the peaceful beginnings of the St. Johns to its rollicking arrival at the Atlantic Ocean, each page delivered a new marvel. Belleville followed his nose deep into the river-weeds, down into underwater caves, and out to the center of beautiful, bird-ful lakes. And he didn't shy away from observing that damnable human yearning to live as close as possible to the water's edge. All the world is wrapped up in this river: I found reason to marvel, reason to r. "whales once breached here," according to S. Moe. This is a terrific book. If you live along the St. Johns you want to read it. It's loaded with information about the human history, natural history, and current condition of the river. It is an engaging read only occasionally mared by bad writing. If you can get past the swamp of the first paragraph the rest is good, with only a few overpriced three dollar words sprinked through the text.

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